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New research shatters conventional gender stereotypes

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

New research has challenged the widespread belief that men are more turned on by pornography than women. A recent meta-analysis consisting of data from over 2,000 people found that women’s brains reacted to visual stimuli just as much as men’s brains did, in contradiction to widespread gender difference assumptions.

These findings may come as a surprise to both men and women, but the research is solid. Hamid Noori and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany analyzed 61 previous sexual response studies that measured brain responses to sexual imagery. Previous findings from these same studies had found that men had elevated responses when shown sexual imagery, and those findings correlated with questionnaire-based research. However, the field of brain scanning has been under criticism in recent years for being prone to drawing conclusions from small differences that could have arisen by chance. When researchers adjusted for studies that did not account for these situational anomalies, they found that women’s and men’s brains showed the same amount of response to the sexual images.

There are a few factors to keep in mind when parsing how this could be true. Conventional wisdom may have indicated that women are less stimulated by pornography than men, but those same beliefs have also told generations of women that they should keep their sexual preferences private. In addition to women being more likely to suppress their sexual desires, they likely watch less pornography because it is more stigmatized, which would in turn influence whether they felt that adult films were a turn-on. David Ley, a writer and sex therapist, told New Scientist that the study shows that “women can be just as visual as men, if they are allowed to be.”

The findings don’t prove women’s and men’s brains react to pornography identically. Noori says that the brain scans they studied only show activity at the level of relatively large anatomical structures, and so there could still be differences at the level of brain cells that don’t show up on scans. But with searches for “porn for women” on the continuous rise, it is reassuring to see that the data is starting to keep up with our arousal. It is only a matter of time until conventional wisdom accepts that men and women are not as different in their desires as we have been led to believe.

Resources:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2209908-sexual-images-are-just-as-arousing-for-women-as-they-are-for-men/

https://nypost.com/2018/01/09/women-are-watching-more-porn-reports/

https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/07/09/1904975116

 

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Porn With Purpose

How Porn Can, Should, and Does Change the World

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

Conversations about porn and making porn rarely involve discussions about real sex. “It’s just a fantasy” is a commonly repeated trope within the older echelons of the adult industry, uttered with exasperation between scheduling talent and setting up perfectly-lit cumshots. “It’s not supposed to be real. This isn’t sex ed.” The disconnect between sex on screen and sex in real life is supposed to be apparent - but the reality is that more and more people are getting their sexual education through porn. In a world where sexual education is often limited to abstinence, or information about birth control and STI’s at best, people have increasingly turned to adult entertainment to learn about pleasure. Is the adult industry ready for that responsibility?

From a purely theoretical viewpoint, these ideas, which are vestigial remnants of porn’s laissez-faire origins, are accurate. Adult films and pictures are made to be stimulating, to provide the viewer with something that they do not have - a fantasy. Producing monetarily successful adult movies is just as formulaic as producing monetarily successful mainstream movies - gather a few trending taboos, lay them across the skeleton of a scenario, and populate it with the latest talent, and you’re sure to make a little money. We’re not being paid to be sex educators, right?

In reality though, nothing exists in a vacuum, especially not media. People can’t help but be influenced by what they see and experience, particularly when it’s emphasized with a strong emotional response, such as pleasure. Porn is already serving the purpose of sexual education: a NUS survey in 2014 found that well over 50% of UK teens were getting their sexual education from adult movies. People can deny porn’s responsibility in the world, but the fact remains that it is a necessary resource - especially as other resources like social media sites are shutting out sexual content.

Far from needing to be shut down, porn remains to provide the visibility that healthy sex requires. As women have stepped up to take charge of their own careers as actors, producers, and business owners in an industry that has traditionally profited from their bodies, they have, one after another, lifted the veil of shame that surrounded them in the past. Using their open identities as a form of protest, the faces of porn have normalized themselves and the industry more than ever before.

The rise of performers in the spotlight has led to their becoming role models, and more people than ever before view “porn star” as a legitimate career choice, with thousands flocking to independent production methods like webcamming and clip production. Porn’s open identity takes a lot of stress off those in the industry, and has opened up a new conversation in the adult industry: how can we maximize the change we create in the world? What good can we do?

With the weight of secrecy lifted, innovators in the industry have stepped forward to answer those questions. Performer owned-and-operated sites stud the internet with ethical porn options that provide the beauty and fantasy required to entertain, as well as presenting the multifaceted realities of sex and intimacy. Consent has become a prominent storyline, and viewers are more likely to search for “porn for women” than ever before - a category that departs from violent or over-manufactured scenarios and puts intimacy, connection, and trust in the spotlight.

The demystification of porn has changed the world of politics, as well. Suddenly, sex workers are able to speak up in the public sphere and be heard. When Kamala Harris announced her intention to run for the presidency, the sex industry spoke out about her history of anti-sexwork legislation. Stormy Daniels, a porn actress, escort, and stripper, has now famously stood up against the President of the United States. Sex workers are credited with the election of Julia Salazar in Brooklyn, and thousands spoke up against the policies of SESTA-FOSTA, which put workers in more danger than the traffickers it sought to curtail. A Belarusian sex worker is held in Russia, and the world cares. The sex industry has become the adult in the room, stepping forward to speak reason to the squabbling children that rely on them - and finally, with some hesitation, humanity has started to listen.

Nothing changes in a day, and pornography is no exception to that rule. So long as there are people who want to see it, there will be questionable content made without regard for responsibility. However, it is clear that more and more people are demanding something real from an industry that once thrived on empty fantasy. The populace has turned to porn for education, and now, pornographers have stepped forward to become educators, leaders, and role models for those who need them.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com 

 

REFERENCES:

Baker-Whitelaw, G. (2015, December 11). U.K. survey says more than half of sex education comes from porn. https://www.dailydot.com/irl/sex-education-porn-study/

National Union of Students. (2014, November). Student Opinion Survey 2014. https://www.nus.org.uk/Global/SRE%20Research%20Nov%202014.pdf.

Padgett, E. (2018, October 02). How Julia Salazar Became the Patron Politician of Sex Workers. https://www.playboy.com/read/julie-salazar

Tyng, C. M. et al. (2017, Aug 24.) The Influences of Emotion on Learning and Memory. Frontiers in Psychology, 2017(8):1454.

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Porn’s Growing Pussy Power

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

More women are directing and producing porn than ever before. From late night “Skinemax” stars to direct-to-DVD dilettantes, adult cinema has rested largely on the backs – and breasts – of women. Women’s bodies are unquestionably the star breadwinners of the adult industry; and more and more frequently, the women themselves are getting to take charge of what that means.

Historically, most adult filmmakers have been men, and most adult films are geared at male audiences. Though a few female directors such as Candida Royalle paved the way, on average women have accounted for less than 20 percent of the nominated directors over the past decade. However, with the advent of internet porn and the resulting free market, not only has the proportion of porn made for women increased, but so has the proportion of porn made by women. Eight out of fifteen of the prestigious XBIZ Award nominations for Best Director – Feature were women this year, as were close to half of those nominated for Best Director by AVN. Women are taking over – and finally starting to reap the rewards of their work.

The availability of home recording technology has played a huge factor in this shift, with more performers producing their own content than has ever been possible in the past. Once surreptitiously produced in locked hotel rooms, porn production has moved into the hands of the multitudes, and it’s possible for talent to build their own following and career without the oversight of big-budget video production companies. However, it’s not just webcamming that has seen a change. Far from the old-school “guy with a camera” stereotypes, many performers are making the jump to behind the lens, lending a fresh feminine take on a traditionally masculine industry.

Though women in any masculine-dominated field face significant obstacles, the adult world is adjusting. This year’s industry-only XBIZ Show in Los Angeles, essentially a networking and trade show for porn, hosted multiple events that highlighted the struggles and successes of women working in pornography – but one only needed to look around to see that women in the business are thriving, and that adult entertainment is growing with them. Other panels covered traditionally feminist topics as well, such as consent on set, “Porn with a Purpose,” and a session entitled “Earning Through Empowerment.”

Clearly, femme filmmakers are forging ahead and changing the face of adult entertainment for the better. For many, films produced by women feel better, too – in an article for The Daily Beast, director Mike Quasar is quoted as saying, “Pornography directed by stereotypical horny males, there’s a lot of that, and a lot of it’s not that good. To bring in a female perspective, even if it’s an incredibly perverse female perspective… I find it far less creepy than if it were similar content by male directors.”

Women have always been the workhorse that carries adult entertainment, and it is truly heartening to see the changes firsthand. Here at the MetArt Network, we’re proud to have such talented female artists creating work for us on both sides of the camera. Notably, we have legendary MetArt-model-turned-producer Ariel Piper Fawn playing a key role at SexArt, and director Sandra Shine taking the helm at Viv Thomas; as well as highly respected artists including Cassandra Keyes, Flora, Natasha Schon, Koenart, Tora Ness, and Red Fox. With more women benefitting from the fruits of their labors and stepping into the roles of director and producer, it is inevitable that more varied, creative, and ethical content is sure to follow.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

Snow, A. (2014, July 05). Defining Feminist Porn: Is That XXX Flick Organic? https://www.thedailybeast.com/defining-feminist-porn-is-that-xxx-flick-organic

Snow, A. (2018, November 24). How Porn’s Female Directors Are Putting Hollywood to Shame. https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-porns-female-directors-are-putting-hollywood-to-shame?ref=scroll

XBIZShow — JAN 14–18 2019 // LOS ANGELES. (n.d.). http://www.xbizshow.com/schedule.php

 

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Faith or Fap: why is the Bible Belt watching so much porn?

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 
 
The religious Bible Belt in the Southern United States is known for its Christian, politically conservative population – but studies over the past decade allude to the idea that maybe the sex-negative South ‘doth protest too much.’ Several recent surveys, all of which were performed by analyzing anonymous user data, indicate that states with more religious conservatives search for more porn, more gay porn, and submit more homemade sex tapes than the rest of the country. This begs the question: Why are these numbers so contrary to what typical religious values espouse?
 
So what gives? There’s a lot to unpack there – after all, conservative Christianity is more readily associated with promise rings than porn. One idea that can be posited about Dixie’s predilection for pornography comes from the psychological concept of reactance. People, when faced with a perceived limitation, will often feel their freedom is being threatened and act out in the manner that has been proscribed against. Assuming that most people in the South were raised in communities with values similar to their own – which is a pretty safe assumption when considering the fact that children of highly religious parents overwhelmingly remain the same faith through adulthood – it is easy to theorize that conservative Christian Southerners might simply be rebelling against social mores that have been passed down to them. As any kinkster or psychologist will tell you, taboo can play a compelling role in sexuality.
 
Aggressive bravado may be another explanation for these statistical anomalies. A recent study found that men who voted for Donald Trump were more likely to be insecure in their masculinity, and there is little that the cult of toxic masculinity hates more than homosexuality. Politicians of the American South are also notoriously anti-porn; it is hardly a stretch to consider that gay men in heavily Republican areas such as the American South may feel compelled to overact in order to defend their masculine identity and place within their communities. A large number of closeted men would create a disparity in the perception of the culture when contrasted with actual practices of everyday people.
 
An opposing theory is that the studies quoted could be statistical anomalies that don’t take into account the current (read as: younger) face of the South. As an audience, we are accustomed to viewing the South as a sort of cartoonish Dixieland, waving Confederate flags and burning crosses. While current events reflect that this is still somewhat true, this may not be a complete vision of the majority of Southerners. Relying on internet analytics may give us a comprehensive view of what internet users are doing, but it could be argued that it does not account for the entire population of an area. Internet users are more likely to be young; internet usage penetration for 18–29-year-olds in the United States has been recorded at 98%, with 97% penetration for 30–49-year-olds. When compared with only 66% penetration for seniors aged 65+ and the fact that seniors 60+ are more likely to be active voters, there is a discrepancy between what older generations of Southerners vote for and what younger Southerners are practicing that needs to be statistically accommodated for.
 
Whichever theory you attribute to these findings, it is important to remember that analysis of trends like those presented can only give us a general idea of correlation, and does not fully allow us to draw conclusions about individuals. American Southerners are statistically likely to be Trump voters and religious conservatives, and people using the internet in these areas search for more porn and more gay porn than the rest of the country. Whether you assign those things meaning in the context of one another is up to you…
 
This post first appeared on MyErotica.com
 
REFERENCES:
 
Brown, E. N. (2018, November 13). Anti-Porn Republicans Haven’t Gone Anywhere. https://reason.com/blog/2018/11/13/porn-panic-in-politics-never-left
 
Feit, N. (2018, February 20). Confederate flag debate in SC to be featured on television program. https://www.thestate.com/entertainment/tv/article201180744.html
 
Keisling, P. (2017, February 8). Our Ever-Older Electorate and What It Means for Democracy. http://www.governing.com/columns/smart-mgmt/col-aging-electorate-voting-participation-democracy.html
 
Knowles, E., and DiMuccio, S. (2018, November 29). How Donald Trump appeals to men secretly insecure about their manhood. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2018/11/29/how-donald-trump-appeals-to-men-secretly-insecure-about-their-manhood/
 
Macinnis, C. C., and Hodson, G. (2014, 10). Do American States with More Religious or Conservative Populations Search More for Sexual Content on Google? Archives of Sexual Behavior, 44(1), 137–147. doi:10.1007/s10508–014–0361–8
 
Mitchell, T. (2016, November 01). The links between religious upbringing, current religious identity. http://www.pewforum.org/2016/10/26/links-between-childhood-religious-upbringing-and-current-religious-identity/
 
Pornhub. (2014, March 6). Porn Equality - Gay Viewers by US State. https://www.pornhub.com/insights/gay-usa-porn-equality
 
Reactance Theory. (n.d.). https://study.com/academy/lesson/psychological-reactance-theory.html
 
Seltzer, L. F. (2012, May 31). The Secret, Taboo Aspects of Male Sexual Desire. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/evolution-the-self/201205/the-secrettaboo-aspects-male-sexual-desire
 
Snow, A. (2014, October 11). Christian Right-Wingers Love Porn: New Studies Suggest the Bible Belt Has A Kinky Side. https://www.thedailybeast.com/christian-right-wingers-love-porn-new-studies-suggest-the-bible-belt-has-a-kinky-side
 
Statista. (n.d.). Share of adults in the United States who use the internet in 2018, by age group. https://www.statista.com/statistics/266587/percentage-of-internet-users-by-age-groups-in-the-us/
 
Vandello, J. A., Bosson, J. K., Cohen, D., Burnaford, R. M., & Weaver, J. R. (2008). Precarious manhood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95(6), 1325–1339.
 
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The Importance of Kinky Sex

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

Voyeurism. Bondage. Cuckolding. Feet. Almost everyone has some kind of kink in their sexual wiring. But where do these predilections come from? And how important are they in the grand schematic of our relationships and sex lives? What happens when you ignore your kinks?

While we can’t place a finger on exactly what creates a fetish or kink, evidence points to these feelings stemming from moments in our formative youth that “crystallize” as part of our identities. This means that we’re likely forming our ideas about sex long before sex itself ever comes into play in our lives.

According to a 2016 survey of over 2000 people in the UK, roughly 75 percent of people have a kinky interest. The importance we place on our kinks varies, of course, depending on how much of a role sex plays in our lives. Some kinks may be a soft interest, easy to brush off. Others, however, can become inextricably linked with our sex drive – sometimes so intensely that they become fetishes that our sex life feels incomplete without. Of course, one can have too much of a good thing; but medical science doesn’t consider paraphilia a problem to be dealt with unless these predilections harm others, or are so strong that they are detrimental to a person’s day-to-day life.

Although sometimes these “unusual” drives can become fixations, for most people sexual fulfilment is important to our relationships and our mental wellbeing. Sexual satisfaction has been repeatedly found to greatly impact people’s quality of life. Though it is unclear if the relationship is causative or corollary (or a combination of the two), people who report high sexual satisfaction also report higher satisfaction in their romantic relationships. What better reason is there to get busy?

Our sex drive is a physiological function that co-evolved to meet our psychological needs for security, self-esteem, and connection, and our kinks are a part of that drive. While sex isn’t a need in and of itself (no one dies from lack of sex, no matter what your high school boyfriend tried to tell you) it leads us to feel connected and secure with our partners, increases oxytocin and serotonin levels and decreases testosterone and prefrontal cortex activity. Moreover, people in consensual BDSM relationships were found to have lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol and also reported greater feelings of relationship closeness and intimacy after their sexual play. In short, having a sex life that we’re happy with makes us happy – and happy people live longer, healthier lives.

The fulfilment of your sex drive is intimately linked to your psychological wellbeing, which is fundamentally linked to your physical wellbeing. This means that, if you look at it the right way, fulfilling your kinks is just as important to your mental health as say, hugging your family or petting your dog. Take time to share your interests with your partner, watch an erotic video, or read a sexy story. Of course no one is obligated to share your kinks with you, but exploring them – on your own or with a partner – is a task essential to your quality of life.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

Aaron, M. (2018, May 30). Growing Up Kinky: Research Shows How Kink Identity Is Formed. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/standard-deviations/201805/growing-kinky-research-shows-how-kink-identity-is-formed

Borresen, K. (2018, July 26). The Difference Between A Fetish And Kink, According To Sex Experts. https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/difference-between-fetish-and-kink_us_5b58a59ae4b0b15aba94749b

Emery, L. R. (2018, April 25). This Is The Most Popular Fetish In The UK. https://www.bustle.com/articles/190171-how-many-people-have-a-sexual-fetish-its-more-common-than-you-think-but-its-still

Flynn, K. E., Lin, L., Bruner, D. W., Cyranowski, J. M., Hahn, E. A., Jeffery, D. D., Reese, J.B., Reeve, B.B., Shelby, R.A., Weinfurt, K. P. (2016, November). Sexual Satisfaction and the Importance of Sexual Health to Quality of Life Throughout the Life Course of US Adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5075511/

Gray, E. (2017, December 07). Is This Type Of Sex Pathological? https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/03/sexual-fetishes-dsm-v_n_3008421.html

Manson, M. (2018, July 08). Sex and Our Psychological Needs. https://markmanson.net/sex-and-our-psychological-needs

Oaklander, M. (2016, February 11). Do Happy People Really Live Longer? http://time.com/4217052/do-happy-people-really-live-longer/

Sagarin, B. J., Cutler, B., Cutler, N., Lawler-Sagarin, K. A., Matuszewich, L. (2009, April). Hormonal changes and couple bonding in consensual sadomasochistic activity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18563549

Shpancer, N. (2014, February 16). Sexual Satisfaction: Highly Valued, Poorly Understood. (n.d.). https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-therapy/201402/sexual-satisfaction-highly-valued-poorly-understood

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Sexual Politics

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

From how we do it to whom we do it with, sex is personal – but is it linked to our politics?

The stereotypes about our political personalities are ubiquitous, especially in the United States. From the promiscuous, birth control using Democrat who supports Planned Parenthood, to the truck balls owning, toxically masculine Republican affirming his “alpha” position by ridiculing his perceived enemies as “cucks,” our views on politics are often linked (in appearance, if not in actuality) to our views on sex. But what kind of sex are Republicans and Democrats actually having? Do our preconceived notions of the parties line up with what’s really happening in their fantasies?

I was surprised to see this discussion on a recent episode of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, a longstanding comedy-news talk show. Though the findings were reduced to a quick punchline, the study Colbert referenced was real. Published in a book entitled “Tell Me What You Want,” Dr. Justin Lehmiller surveyed 4,175 adult Americans from all 50 states, collecting data on a variety of different situations, people, political figures and other potential turn-ons. The analysis shines an interesting light on the American sexual psyche.

Republicans, for instance, were more likely to fantasize about activities that involve sex outside of marriage like infidelity, orgies and partner swapping, including 1970s-style “key parties” and modern-day forms of swinging. Republicans also reported more fantasies with voyeuristic themes, including visiting strip clubs and practicing something known as “cuckolding” which involves watching one’s partner have sex with someone else, specifically someone who is better in bed than you are. This is the origin of the term “cuck,” which has become a popular pejorative in modern Republican and “Proud Boy” online communities.

Democrats, on the other hand, were more likely to fantasize about sexual activities that involved power dynamics, such as BDSM. In fact, the largest bedroom disparity between Republicans and Democrats was their interest in masochism – enjoying pleasure through the experience of pain. Spanking, bondage, and dominant/submissive roleplay were far more likely to titillate Democrats than Republicans.

Dr. Lehmiller’s theory about these differences between the parties boils down to a mainline through the human psyche regardless of politics – the appeal of taboo. It’s easy to see where these marked disparities may come from when viewed through this frame. Republicans are guided by a party platform that touts the “sanctity of traditional marriage,” which would make any sort of non-monogamous exploration verboten. Meanwhile, Democrats may be drawn to power exchange because their party so staunchly stands for equality. Dr Lehmiller writes, “The appeal of the taboo stems from a long-standing principle of psychology known as reactance – which stipulates that when our freedom is threatened and we’re told we can’t do something, we want to do it even more. Many a parent has discovered this principle and used it to their benefit in shaping behavior through reverse psychology: Frame the desired act as something your [offspring] isn’t allowed to do and you just might get what you want.”

There were many similarities between the fantasy lives of those surveyed, as well. Markedly crossing party lines was the inclination toward trying new things, whether they be new partners or new experiences. Additionally, almost everyone surveyed reported that they enjoyed situations and scenarios where they felt validated and competent, indicating that we seek to fulfil our emotional desires even in our fantasies. Behind all of our political slogans and kinky fantasies, it would seem that humans are still striving to meet the same set of psychological needs.

While one cannot jump to conclusions about our sexual proclivities based on survey alone, it’s important to note this data and frame it within the greater spectrum of knowledge. Our sexuality is of course not solely the product of our politics – but this research shows that the two appear to be linked. It stands to reason that the frame with which we view the world would also be the frame with which we view ourselves – and our sexuality.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

REFERENCES:

Brehm, J.W. (1966). A theory of psychological reactance. http://psycnet.apa.org/record/1967-08061-000

Lehmiller, J. (2018, August 28). Tell Me What You Want. https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/justin-j-lehmiller/tell-me-what-you-want/9780738234953/

Lehmiller, J., Scher, B., Greenfield, J., and Alberta, T. (2018, October 27). Republicans and Democrats Don’t Just Disagree About Politics. They Have Different Sexual Fantasies. https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/10/27/sexual-fantasies-republicans-democrats-politics-221919

Schwartz, D. (2016, August 01). Why Angry White Men Love Calling People “Cucks”. https://www.gq.com/story/why-angry-white-men-love-calling-people-cucks

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. (2018, November 03). Republicans And Democrats Have Different Sexy Thoughts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3neoZaTEUeM

Urban Dictionary (n.d.). Truck balls. https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=truck%20balls

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Want better sex? Stop calling it "foreplay."

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

From magazines in the checkout line to scholarly articles and talk shows, the conversation about good sex is hard to avoid. Everyone wants better sex, and every suggestion comes back to the same thing – foreplay. But perhaps part of the problem is the way we’re framing that conversation. What would happen if we stopped calling it “foreplay”?

It’s commonly said that the way to make sex better for women is foreplay. Touching, kissing, oral sex – all of these fall under the foreplay umbrella. Calling these foreplay suggests that men can or should do them for women, but that they’re not a part of the “real deal” of penetrative sex. But why should these things be optional?

Sex is supposed to be an activity that is pleasurable for both partners. If what we call “foreplay” is the part of sex that makes women more likely to orgasm, then using language that makes it seem like it’s an extra, skippable step is only harmful to female sexuality. Studies have shown that men, on average, take 2–10 minutes to reach orgasm, while women take an average of twenty minutes. Additionally, women who have had one orgasm in a session are more likely to have another. However, according to Planned Parenthood, 30 percent of women have had trouble reaching an orgasm, and as many as 80 percent have difficulty reaching orgasm through vaginal intercourse. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could close that gap?

Perhaps if we stopped treating the non-penetrative aspects of sex like they’re a chore that one can opt out of, sex would be more equitable and enjoyable for both men and women. After all, who doesn’t love making their partner orgasm? Let’s stop calling the parts of sex that women find enjoyable “foreplay” and start calling them what they really are – good, enjoyable SEX.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

Lenhardt, K. (2017, March 17). Interesting Facts for the Curious Mind. https://www.factretriever.com/orgasm-facts

Sargent, C. (2017, January 19). Can we stop calling it “foreplay”? Because it’s sex, straight up. https://hellogiggles.com/love-sex/foreplay-isnt-actually-foreplay-at-all-its-sex-and-should-be-treated-as-such/

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Yeah I masturbate

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

When I was in my punk phase, I acquired a pin that proudly proclaimed, YEAH, I MASTURBATE. I thought it was hilarious, but I don’t believe I truly appreciated how political the statement was. Despite a thousand euphemisms, masturbation is something rarely discussed and almost never referred to by name. But what if our aversion to calling it what it is  – self pleasure – is holding us back from really enjoying it?

Handed to us via thousands of years of religious and societal reinforcement, the reason we giggle or shift uncomfortably in our seats at any reference to masturbation is that annoying social shaper, shame. Unlike its sister emotion, guilt, which informs the brain that “what I have done is bad,” shame lacks that key distinction and tells us “I am bad.” Presumably, the function of shame is to encourage us to improve our behavior in future. While shame can have healthy applications, such as making us strive to do better by our peers, feeling like you’re dirty or disgusting is a major mood killer.

Shame has been linked to addiction, perfectionism, depression and low self-esteem – and none of those are drives we want anywhere near our sexuality, save for certain consensual fetish activities. Being ashamed can impel us to attack ourselves, or to externalize our emotions by attacking other people, which causes the cycle to continue. When a comedian mentions masturbation and everyone giggles nervously or sinks into their seats, it’s not because the joke is inherently funny – it’s because we’ve been taught that this activity is shameful. Both the joke and the response are part of a circle of conditioning, passing the shame from person to person. Everyone goes home having the shame of touching themselves reinforced, and no one feels very sexy about it.

So how do we combat the social stigma that causes us to feel so much shame about self-pleasure? After all, we’ve already proven countless times that masturbation is healthy, normal, and even good for you – it certainly seems that we should be over this hang-up by now. We’re conscious that having a good wank is nothing to be ashamed of. Now, if only we could fight the blush rising in our cheeks at the very thought of it…

I heartily recommend freeing yourself from the inherited shame of masturbation, and start calling your “alone time” what it is. In the process, you will start relieving others of that shame as well. Obviously you don’t want to force the topic onto others without their consent, but talking about your feelings and being frank about fingering (or your own preferred method) is the best hope for society to heal our collective discomfort surrounding masturbation. If we can stop passing our shame to others, we can actively create a positive culture and work toward wholeheartedly embracing healthy sexuality.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

Ashby, J. S., Rice, K. G., & Martin, J. L. (2006, 04). Perfectionism, Shame, and Depressive Symptoms. Journal of Counseling & Development, 84(2), 148–156. doi:10.1002/j.1556–6678.2006.tb00390.x

Capretto, L. (2013, April 18). WATCH: What To Tell Yourself When You Screw Up. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/18/brene-brown-shame-guilt-addiction-oprah_n_2966351.html

Crew, B. (2018, January 25). Is Masturbation Good For You? Science Weighs In. https://www.sciencealert.com/is-masturbation-good-for-you-science-answer

Gregoire, C. (2016, March 03). The Unexpected Reason It’s Healthy To Feel Shame. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/shame-psychology-evolution_us_56d4428ce4b0871f60ebf5c9

Gruenewald, T. L., Kemeny, M. E., Aziz, N., & Fahey, J. L. (2004, 11). Acute Threat to the Social Self: Shame, Social Self-esteem, and Cortisol Activity. Psychosomatic Medicine, 66(6), 915–924. doi:10.1097/01.psy.0000143639.61693.ef

Sack, D. (2015, January 13). 5 Ways to Silence Shame. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/where-science-meets-the-steps/201501/5-ways-silence-shame

Wehrenberg, M. (2015, July 7). Shame and Depression. https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/depression-management-techniques/201507/shame-and-depression

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We All Love Porn

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

The data is in – basically, everyone enjoys porn.

We do it in private, behind closed bathroom and bedroom doors, or maybe with a trusted partner; the use of pornography is as widespread as the stigma against it. From romance novels to raunchy pics and videos, the data adds up – basically, it seems that everyone enjoys erotic entertainment in some form or another. So how many of us are watching, who are we, and what are we searching for? 

Analytics suggest that consuming porn, particularly videos viewed over the internet, is a ubiquitous habit. The numbers are staggeringly large, but not surprising – according to statistics released by the internet’s largest porn provider, their site alone averaged 81 million visitors per day in 2017 (28.5 billion visitors for the year), with 24.7 billion searches performed. That translates to roughly 800 searches per second, a statistic which their report helpfully relates to the number of hamburgers per second sold by fast food giant McDonald’s. In total, 595,482 hours of video were uploaded to their site, which is 68 years of porn if watched continuously. That’s only one website, for one year – it’s safe to extrapolate that usage is far higher when considering other sources and forms of erotica that are more difficult to find data on.

When sorted by visits to the same website, the United States tops the ranks of porn use, followed by the United Kingdom, India, Japan, and Canada. Visits soared in some places – particularly Ethiopia, which rose 68 places in the ranking in the course of the year. Unsurprisingly, people seem to watch porn mostly at night, with the highest traffic consistently between 11pm and 1am. 

Possibly more surprising is the shrinking gender gap reported in a 10 year meta analysis which found that men had only slightly higher usage numbers than women. According to a report by ATTN, in 2014, 79 percent of 18 to 30-year-old American men watched internet porn at least once per month, barely exceeding 76 percent of 18 to 30-year-old American women. That number is on the rise, too – every top 20 country except Russia saw an increase in female visits versus 2016, and searches for “porn for women” increased over 1400 percent. 

Erotic expression is clearly something many of us enjoy, then; but what we choose to partake in encompasses a wide variety. “Lesbian” has long been – and continues to be – the most sought after genre, followed by “hentai” (anime porn), “milf,” “stepmom,” “stepsister,” and “mom.” The search terms that trended were even more interesting – terms like “Rick and Morty” and “Fidget Spinners” suggest novelty is the key to excitement for jaded consumers. Here at MetArt we hope our commitment to producing classy erotica with naturally beautiful girls will keep us high on your ‘favorites’ list!

The numbers don’t lie; almost everyone is enjoying some form of pornography. We’re sexual creatures by nature, and erotica is a natural extension and expression of that sexuality. Studies have shown that the enjoyment of erotica increases both arousability and romantic harmony. 

Despite current anti-porn sentiment in certain political circles, conscious and responsible porn use is a healthy habit that is past due to be accepted as part of our everyday sex lives. 

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES

Bahadur, Nina. "Women Are Way More Into Porn Than Many Think, Suggests Survey." The Huffington Post. November 18, 2013. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/18/women-and-porn-survey-ann-summers-sex_n_4297183.html

Both, Stephanie, Spiering, Mark, Everaerd, Walter, and Laan, Ellen. "Sexual behavior and responsiveness to sexual stimuli following laboratory‐induced sexual arousal." The Journal of Sex Research41, no. 3 (2004): 242-58. doi:10.1080/00224490409552232

Crandall, Diana. "Here's Who Is Actually Watching Porn." ATTN: December 11, 2015. https://www.attn.com/stories/4626/internet-porn-demographics

Petersen, J. L., and Shibley, J.S. "A meta-analytic review of research on gender differences in sexuality, 1993–2007." PsycNET. Accessed February 23, 2018. http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-24669-006

Leigh, Allison. "The Key to Desire." MetArt Blog. Accessed February 23, 2018. https://www.metart.com/blog/20180216/The_key_to_desire__how_to_unlock_this_life_enhancing_drive/

Silver, Curtis. "Pornhub 2017 Year In Review Insights Report Reveals Statistical Proof We Love Porn." Forbes. January 09, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/curtissilver/2018/01/09/pornhub-2017-year-in-review-insights-report-reveals-statistical-proof-we-love-porn/#1897f61424f5

"2017 Year in Review." Pornhub Insights. January 19, 2018. https://www.pornhub.com/insights/2017-year-in-review

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Faking a headache: is there a gender gap when it comes to sexual desire?

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

The oversexed fraternity brother, the pushy husband, the housewife who feigns a headache – familiar stereotypes, derived from an assumption that men have a higher sex drive than women. But is that truly the case?

The idea that most women have a lower sex drive than men is socially ingrained. It features in our cultural tropes, mirroring how it features in our daily lives – a culture where women deny their sexual desires, and many men feel that aggressive pursuit of sex is the only way to obtain it. Women’s lack of desire for sex, especially as they get older, is treated as an innate fact that men must overcome.

At a superficial glance, statistics appear to back this up – by a small margin, men do report higher sexual desire, activity, and more permissive attitudes toward sex. However, a ten-year meta study conducted by University of Wisconsin, Madison found that these results are closely tied to social factors, including age, race, and religion, indicating that sociocultural attitudes toward sex are what leads to the gender gap when it comes to sexual desire.

Psychologists Janet Hyde and Jennifer L. Petersen analyzed more than 800 sexuality studies over a period of 15 years. Their abstract states that they found “that men reported slightly more sexual experience and more permissive attitudes than women for most of the variables. However... most gender differences in sexual attitudes and behaviors were small. Exceptions were masturbation incidence, pornography use, casual sex, and attitudes toward casual sex... nations and ethnic groups with greater gender equity had smaller gender differences for some reported sexual behaviors than nations and ethnic groups with less gender equity.” Furthermore, they found that while a woman’s sex drive may decrease over time, this correlated more strongly with monogamy than with age.

With these facts in mind, it is time to discard the notion that women have an inherently lower sex drive than men – and instead turn a critical eye toward a culture that encourages disparity between genders, sexual violence, and judgmental behaviors such as ‘slut shaming’ for women who are openly sexual.

Women are challenging gender inequity in many arenas, with recent movements such as the SlutWalk, #MeToo and Time’s Up just the most visible and vocal examples of a drive to turn the spotlight on outdated and harmful stereotypes and behaviors.

Women reclaim the right to explore and express their sexual desires freely, without fear of recrimination; and what could be hotter than a woman who knows what she wants and isn’t afraid to claim it as her right?

Here at the MetArt Network, we love to see women taking charge, expressing themselves sexually in whatever way comes naturally. Perhaps if society allowed all women to feel that it was safe to be their true sexual selves, no one would feel the need to fake a headache again. 

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

1. Petersen, J. L., & Hyde, J. S. (2010) A meta-analytic review of research on gender differences in sexuality, 1993–2007. Psychological Bulletin, 136 (1), 21-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0017504

2. Bergner, D. (2013) “Unexcited? There May Be a Pill for That.” The New York Times, 22 May [Online].  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/magazine/unexcited-there-may-be-a-pill-for-that.html

3. Gross, J.  (2014) “5 Studies That Offer Fascinating Conclusions about Human Sexuality.” TED Blog, 30 Oct. [Online]. blog.ted.com/6-studies-that-offer-fascinating-conclusions-about-human-sexuality/.

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Is Porn Cheating?

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

When it comes to infidelity, where does fantasy cross the line?

Sexuality, while an integral part of the human experience, is something that continues to polarize pundits and plain folks alike. With adult entertainment at the forefront of politics across the US and UK right now, opinions are not in short supply. Something that continues to perplex us is where pornography sits in the scope of our marriages and relationships. Is viewing porn cheating, or is the link between erotic materials and romance more complex than that?

A new study released in February of this year sought to answer that question by comparing opinions on pornography with other cultural attitudes in the United States and Spain. In examining the data gathered from University of Florida and the University of Alicante, researchers found that an overwhelming number of participants (73 percent in USA and 77 percent in Spain) believe that viewing erotic materials is not cheating.

In the sample that did find porn use to be infidelity, researchers found strong correlations to their lifestyles, including religiosity, relationship status, and overall attitudes on jealousy and infidelity. A participant from the United States was more likely to view porn as cheating, as was someone who did not use erotic materials themselves, or was single (and therefore perhaps more likely to be idealistically rigid about their attitudes toward relationships). Having low self-esteem was also a factor tied to attitudes on porn and infidelity, but only in participants from the US. Interestingly, there weren’t any gender differences – women were not more likely than men to view porn as cheating.

Church attendance was the strongest predictor of a participant’s attitude toward erotic materials and infidelity. In respondents from the US, being religious predicted the view that porn is cheating, whereas Spanish respondents showed no such effect. About 70 percent of Spaniards identify as Catholics, but only around 9 percent of citizens attend church at least monthly. In contrast, as many as 42 percent of Americans attend church weekly. This suggests that it is attendance of church services, rather than self-identification as religious, that has an impact on one’s views on pornography.

Also worth noting is that Europeans, including Spanish Catholics, tend to be less punitive about sex in general, and also less dogmatic and energized about their religion, compared to many US evangelical churchgoers. These differences may also account for the differentiation between the two countries regarding whether or not low self-esteem played a factor in participants’ opinions on infidelity – it is hardly a stretch to think that those with a pronounced desire to belong to a group may feel more pressure to conform to church ideologies.

So is the answer to avoiding marital strife a detailed survey of your partner’s demographics? Are our cultural attitudes toward porn immutable? Hardly! Studies have shown that porn use adds more positive things to your relationship than negative, including improved sexual communication – if things are properly discussed. Couples have reported that they perceived porn as being linked to more sexual experimentation and sexual comfort in their relationships. Viewing pornography is also tied to higher levels of arousability, which can keep a sexual relationship alive.

As with all things in a partnership, communication is key – talk to your partner about their attitudes to porn and infidelity. While this is a conversation that many avoid due to fear of ensuing conflict, discussing these things early on can allow couples to navigate potential problems before they occur. Odds are that your partner will be amenable to your viewing habits, and honesty is far preferable to introducing secrecy and deception into your relationship, which is more likely to hurt your partner. Instead of undermining trust, use the conversation as an opportunity to promote understanding and develop your sexuality together. Strong relationships are built upon strong communication – something no amount of porn can damage or replace. We hope MetArt will play a role in that communication.

This post first appeared on MyErotica.com

 

REFERENCES:

“Dogmatic and Spiritual Religion.” Psychology Today. Accessed March 26, 2018. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/out-the-darkness/201412/dogmatic-and-spiritual-religion

“Is Watching Pornography a Form of Cheating? It Depends.” Psychology Today. Accessed March 26, 2018. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/women-who-stray/201802/is-watching-pornography-form-cheating-it-depends

“Why Secrets Can Ruin Relationships.” Psychology Today. Accessed March 26, 2018. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/love-and-sex-in-the-digital-age/201609/why-secrets-can-ruin-relationships

Stephanie Both, Mark Spiering, Walter Everaerd, and Ellen Laan. “Sexual Behavior and Responsiveness to Sexual Stimuli following Laboratory‐induced Sexual Arousal.” The Journal of Sex Research 41, no. 3 (08 2004): 242–58. doi:10.1080/00224490409552232.

Taylor Kohut, William A. Fisher, and Lorne Campbell. “Perceived Effects of Pornography on the Couple Relationship: Initial Findings of Open-Ended, Participant-Informed, “Bottom-Up” Research.” Archives of Sexual Behavior 46, no. 2 (07, 2016): 585–602. doi:10.1007/s10508–016–0783–6.

Charles Negy, Diego Plaza, Abilio Reig-Ferrer, and Maria Dolores Fernandez-Pascual. “Is Viewing Sexually Explicit Material Cheating on Your Partner? A Comparison Between the United States and Spain.” Archives of Sexual Behavior 47, no. 3 (02, 2018): 737–45. doi:10.1007/s10508–017–1125-z.

 

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The key to desire: how to unlock this life-enhancing drive

About the author: Allison Leigh is a pornographer, producer, polyamorist, and professional kinkster. When sexuality is business, business is fun! 

The fluttering in your stomach, the tightness in your chest, the heat between your legs – sexual arousal is a nearly universal experience amongst humankind. We feel it when we crave our partners, strangers, even celebrities. For some of us, the desire is overwhelming; for others, barely a note in the margins. Where do these feelings come from? What do we do when it changes?

Our sexuality can play a major role in our quality of life and decision-making processes. As sexual desire ebbs and flows, new dilemmas come with it. Our responses vary – we masturbate, we have promiscuous sex (or avoid sex altogether), we watch porn, we cheat. A crucial key to understanding human sexuality lies in discovering where the desire for sex comes from, and if it can be controlled.

Outside of little blue pills, most advice regarding desire centers around trying to stimulate or repress the emotional state, and pays little attention to what ignites it. According to the ubiquitous mid-century sex study by Masters and Johnson, sexual encounters begin with sexual desire, which then leads to partner-seeking and sexual arousal. However, a University of Amsterdam study from 2004 indicates that we respond physically to highly sexual visuals before our mind even engages with them – meaning that sexual arousal actually precedes sexual desire, instead of the other way around. Sexual desire may be the cognitive overlay we place on top of what our body is already feeling.

Researchers Ellen Laan, Stephanie Both, Walter Everaerd and Mark Spiering examined college students’ physical responses to sexual images, and compared them with self-reported feelings of desire as well as sexual activity following exposure to these images. They contrasted these findings with a control group that was shown neutral images.

Through their series of studies, they found that the body’s entire motor system ignites when shown sexual images. The more intense the visual, the more intense the spinal tendinous impulses they observed.  Further, these reactions occurred with no regard to whether the sexual material was consciously recognized. Our bodies are primed for sexual action before our minds have even considered being turned on. Their findings matched what researchers have been finding true in other aspects of our lives – that our brains are awakened to what needs to happen before we are conscious of wanting to do anything.

This means that the key to awakening a lower sex drive is likely increasing arousability – the physical cues that signal us to feel desire. Turning aside from the conventional wisdom of placing the root of the problem on a lack of sexy thoughts, perhaps the focus should instead be on creating the physical, mental, and emotional environment necessary for sexuality to thrive.

So how do we proceed? When sexual desire no longer comes unbidden, how do we summon it? The answer will vary for everyone, but one simple solution may be right there in the research – look at erotica! Porn doesn’t have to be an immediate precursor to sexual activity. Making sexuality and sensuality a part of daily life pushes your body’s sexual responses to stay active. Combined with creating a safe atmosphere for sexuality, enjoying erotic visuals alone or with a partner will help keep sexual arousal – and therefore sexual desire – a hot and fulfilling part of your life. Naturally, MetArt is thrilled to play a role in such a vital and life-enhancing process.

REFERENCES:

Angier, N. (2007) ‘Birds do it, bees do it, people seek the keys to it.’ The New York Times.  April 10 [Online]. Available at: www.nytimes.com/2007/04/10/science/10desi.html?

Both, S., Spiering, M., Everaerd, W. and Laan, E. (2004) Sexual behavior and responsiveness to sexual stimuli following laboratory-induced sexual arousal. The Journal of Sex Research, 41 (3).

 

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International Women’s Day: celebrate female sexuality

Today – March 8, 2017 – is International Women’s Day, a time when women across the globe celebrate our social, economic, cultural and political achievements, and call for gender equality. Supporting the advance of empowerment, inclusion and parity is surely a no-brainer for anyone with a conscience, male or female.

As a girl who spends her life writing, reading and watching erotica, I sometimes get asked whether being a feminist is compatible with working in the adult industry, as if the two were mutually exclusive; when in fact, I think it’s the most natural match I’ve ever encountered. In what other sphere do women freely and openly admit they love sex? That they fantasize, masturbate, chase multiple orgasms greedily? That they find erotic images and films highly arousing? Stigmatizing and slut-shaming sexually active and assertive women is still prevalent out in the real world in 2017, ridiculously old fashioned and prejudiced though it seems.

And yet, it’s a sad fact that I’ve lost female friends when I’ve revealed what I do for a living. Women judging other women for choosing to exercise their right to make their own choices about their body and their sexuality seems like a terrible double standard to me. I don’t believe I should have to be secretive about the fact that I write erotica. I’m not ashamed of it, I’m proud of it!

I find it ironic that the adult industry, often misjudged as sexist by outsiders, is actually the most level playing field I’ve experienced. There are women working at every level, from performers to stylists, writers, directors, photographers, entrepeneurs and CEOs – the only requirement to succeed is talent, and many women who start out as performers go on to enjoy very successful careers in other aspects of the industry. It’s utterly inclusive, maybe because it tends to attract open-minded, creative individuals who aren’t too interested in following other people’s rules.

As for the performers, I’ve been on shoots with brand new models, and an interesting thing happens when they step in front of the camera for the first time. As they shed their clothes, they shed their inhibitions too. They feel beautiful, sexy, confident; not just because they know they are desired, but because they fully inhabit their own sexual power.

So on International Women’s Day 2017, let’s celebrate the beautiful MetArt models who lay bare their sexuality so openly for us; the women behind the scenes who make it possible for them to do so; and the fact that we all enjoy the freedom to watch them.  

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    a.k.a. 2 seconds ago

    Thanks for the reply.
    You say it well: if "sexual" hair is one of your favorite things on a young woman, MET is *not* for you. It's a miracle that Rylsky's Kristel showed up here; miracles are rare ☝️😇
    I tend to look at MET models in terms of "girlfriend" material: is she attractive and appealing enough to make me think she might be good enough for that. A hardcore model is automatically off that list, as are models who are always denuded. Other turn-offs for me include belly-piercings (suspect judgement to get one of those!) and tats (again, very suspect judgement.)
    It certainly is a matter of taste, and mine is fairly narrow when it comes to "gf" material.
    I was thinking of an "a" to "r" scale: from "attractive" to "repellant." There's one at the very extreme of the "a" side, and a number who go far the other way.
    I emphasize that all I know of these girls is what I see on the internet. In "real life", in person, things could well be different.

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    Checkers 21 seconds ago

    I like being infatuated. 🙂

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    Checkers 20 minutes ago

    Someone's in a bad mood today. 🙂

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    Checkers 26 minutes ago

    I always liked "Jumping Jesus on a pogo stick." Thank you Dead Milkmen. 😉

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    a.k.a. 27 minutes ago

    I'm pretty easy-to-please at restaurants, if they're not too expensive, but here it's true: I tend to focus on what I don't like. It's not hard; there's not much I like ☝️😆
    I apply a very high standard.

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    Checkers 30 minutes ago

    I personally prefer the "cute little bush" look, neatly trimmed and shaped, like Lily C or Alisa A (in her sets shot by Pasha). But the importance of the appearance (or not) of hair down there is wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy down the list of things that matter to me. Always glad to see it; not heartbroken if I don't.

    Zestasia is a lovely Kristel set, I especially like the second half where she's wearing stockings. My favorable or not-favorable appraisal of her is much more based on how often she appears bottomless (hooray!).

    And I have ZERO hang-ups about HC models appearing here. Personally, there are quite a few who I'd love to see portrayed with MET's glamorous style.

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    john9876 35 minutes ago

    Excellent set! Love shots #5, #71, #93!

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    a.k.a. 36 minutes ago

    Looks airbrushed to me.

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    Spatz 2 39 minutes ago

    Ihre schönen Beine erregen mich, mein Spatz steht steif hoch...

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    seve 40 minutes ago

    when a.k.a. visits a restaurant - and dinner is served - no doubt the waiter comes back to check on him and says.. "Excuse me Sir, is ANYTHING ok?"

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